What GCSEs do you need to become a paramedic?

You’ll need a minimum of five 9-4 (A*-C) grade GCSEs (or the equivalent), including maths, English and science. If you go onto do further study – such as A levels or an equivalent level 3 qualification, you would have a wider range of options open to you, to become a paramedic.

What qualifications do you need to be a paramedic UK?

To practise as a paramedic, you’ll first need to successfully complete an approved degree in paramedic science or with an apprenticeship degree.

or equivalent qualifications:

  • a BTEC, HND or HNC, including science.
  • a relevant NVQ.
  • a science- or health-based access course.
  • equivalent Scottish or Irish qualifications.

How much does a paramedic earn UK?

The average paramedic salary is £27,312 within the UK. Newly qualified paramedics can expect to earn at least £21,000 starting in Band 5 under the NHS Agenda for Change pay scale. A paramedic salary rises for those who undertake extended skills training in critical care or trauma.

WHAT A level subjects do you need to be a paramedic?

The qualifications needed to be a paramedic are either a diploma, foundation degree or degree in paramedic science or paramedic practice. To apply for the course you’ll need a full driving license; three A-levels, including a science; and five GCSEs at grade 4 or above, including English language, maths and science.

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Can I be a paramedic with no qualifications?

Other roles in the ambulance service do not require a degree. You could work as an emergency care assistant, supporting a paramedic within the ambulance team, or as an emergency call handler or emergency medical dispatcher. Emergency care assistants usually need a minimum of around three GSCEs or equivalent.

How much does a student paramedic earn UK?

The highest salary for a Student Paramedic in United Kingdom is £30,204 per year. The lowest salary for a Student Paramedic in United Kingdom is £16,266 per year.

Is a paramedic a good job UK?

One of the most important jobs in the UK today is that of a Paramedic. A Paramedic in today’s world is very important and is an essential and vital part, not just of the NHS, but also of the community in general.

How long are paramedic shifts UK?

Your standard working week will be around 37.5 hours on shift pattern which will usually include nights, early starts, evenings, weekends and bank holidays. As a paramedic, you’ll be paid on the Agenda for Change (AFC) pay system [4], typically starting at band 5 and progressing to band 6 after two years.

Is it hard to get a job as a paramedic?

Graduate paramedics are finding it difficult to find work because of the high number of students looking for jobs. … This is even lower than 2015, where only 259 new paramedics out of 700 graduate students were employed, according to Ambulance Employee Union secretary Steve McGhie.

Is paramedic a good career?

Becoming a paramedic can prove to be a highly rewarding and door-opening career path. Paramedics serve a vital role in healthcare because of their ability to show compassion, safely transport patients to a hospital, and provide first aid during medical emergencies.

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Can I become a paramedic without GCSEs?

There are three ways to become a paramedic. … For the student paramedic route, good GCSE grades may be sufficient, and so you may not need A levels. However, whichever route you choose, you must check with the university or ambulance service trust to find out what their requirements are, as they set their own.

What grades do I need for paramedic science?

You will need to apply directly to the university of your choice and have a good standard of education. This is generally five GCSEs at grade C or above (including maths, English and a science) or equivalent. You will also need: 360 CATS points (equivalent to three A-levels) for entry onto the BSc Hons programme.

Is a paramedic a doctor?

Paramedics are highly trained, degree -level professionals. They have been first responders in a variety of situations, They also see the same types of patients as GPs, and are experts at keeping patients at home and linked to various community teams.

Ambulance in action