Quick Answer: Are EMTs allowed to give insulin?

“In most states, basic EMTs [emergency medical technicians] cannot administer glucagon,” said study senior author Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. But paramedics can give the injections, said Dr.

Why can’t paramedics give insulin?

Boston, MA — A hypoglycemic episode is caused by too much insulin or too little sugar in the body and if left untreated may lead to seizures, unconsciousness, loss of brain tissue and sometimes death.

What drugs can an EMT administer?

Medications authorized for administration by EMTs are:

  • Activated Charcoal.
  • Albuterol.
  • Aspirin.
  • Epinephrine, 1:1,000 via EpiPen® or vial.
  • Nitroglycerin (Tablet or Spray)
  • Oral Glucose Gel.
  • Oxygen.
  • Tylenol.

Can EMTs inject?

The changes allow EMTs to administer epinephrine by injection, meaning the drugs is drawn into a needle from a vial, as opposed to using an auto-injector like the name brand EpiPen device. Epinephrine is used in life-threatening cases of serious allergic reactions.

How does an EMT treat hyperglycemia?

Emergency treatment for severe hyperglycemia

  1. Fluid replacement. You’ll receive fluids — usually through a vein (intravenously) — until you’re rehydrated. …
  2. Electrolyte replacement. Electrolytes are minerals in your blood that are necessary for your tissues to function properly. …
  3. Insulin therapy.
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Can an EMT basic give Narcan?

Twenty-four states legally allow intermediate EMS (AEMT and EMT-I) and paramedics to carry and administer naloxone. Five states allow all levels of EMS aside from EMR to carry and administer naloxone, and 19 states allow all levels of first responders to carry and dispense the drug.

Can a basic EMT give nitroglycerin?

Procedure. A certified EMT-B should deliver pre-prescribed nitroglycerin or a brochodilator to a patient if the patient indicates (verbally, by gesture, etc.) their desire to take their medication and the delivery of such medication is not contraindicated by protocol or the EMT-B’s training.

When do you give oral glucose EMT?

Oral glucose is part of many EMS protocols when the patient is awake enough to cooperate, has an intact gag reflex that will protect the patient from aspirating the substance, and is not nauseated or vomiting.

What is the normal range for blood sugar?

A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) is normal. A reading of more than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) after two hours indicates diabetes. A reading between 140 and 199 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L and 11.0 mmol/L) indicates prediabetes.

What does glucagon do for the body?

Glucagon’s role in the body is to prevent blood glucose levels dropping too low. To do this, it acts on the liver in several ways: It stimulates the conversion of stored glycogen (stored in the liver) to glucose, which can be released into the bloodstream. This process is called glycogenolysis.

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